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brooklynmuseum:

“A loop after a loop. Hour after hour my madness becomes crochet.” - says #BKArtistsBall artist Olek who covers people, objects and places in bright, cozy knits. Today she will cover our Instagram!
Here’s Olek on a fence in Red Hook, Whateverrrr (image © Jaime Rojo brooklynstreetart).

brooklynmuseum:

A loop after a loop. Hour after hour my madness becomes crochet.” - says #BKArtistsBall artist Olek who covers people, objects and places in bright, cozy knits. Today she will cover our Instagram!

Here’s Olek on a fence in Red Hook, Whateverrrr (image © Jaime Rojo brooklynstreetart).

(Source: brooklynstreetart)

*74
brooklynmuseum:

Springtime is upon us and this year’s especially long winter makes us appreciate it even more so. The transition to warmer temperatures usually coincides with brighter colors all around us like pink, purple, peach, coral, and blue. 
The Brooklyn Museum’s former Edward C. Blum Design Laboratory in Decorative Arts influenced fashion designers and manufacturers by making costume and textile works available to members for research. As a service to Design Lab members, the department staff produced color direction cards, or swatch samples, twice a year for designers in fashion and home interiors. In the Spring 1965 issue of Color Directions, pictured above, the forecast predicts:
“Pinks of all varieties will be featured in both apparel and home-furnishing market. While some amber tonalities will undoubtedly carry over from Fall 1964, clear pinks and rose reds, 296-311, look fresher. An old favorite, American Beauty, returns in a brighter version, 311.”

Photo: Brooklyn Museum Archives. Records of the Department of Costumes and Textiles: Edward C. Blum Design Laboratory. Swatches: Color Directions, Spring 1965.Posted by Eunice Liu

brooklynmuseum:

Springtime is upon us and this year’s especially long winter makes us appreciate it even more so. The transition to warmer temperatures usually coincides with brighter colors all around us like pink, purple, peach, coral, and blue.

The Brooklyn Museum’s former Edward C. Blum Design Laboratory in Decorative Arts influenced fashion designers and manufacturers by making costume and textile works available to members for research. As a service to Design Lab members, the department staff produced color direction cards, or swatch samples, twice a year for designers in fashion and home interiors. In the Spring 1965 issue of Color Directions, pictured above, the forecast predicts:

“Pinks of all varieties will be featured in both apparel and home-furnishing market. While some amber tonalities will undoubtedly carry over from Fall 1964, clear pinks and rose reds, 296-311, look fresher. An old favorite, American Beauty, returns in a brighter version, 311.”

Photo: Brooklyn Museum Archives. Records of the Department of Costumes and Textiles: Edward C. Blum Design Laboratory. Swatches: Color Directions, Spring 1965.
Posted by Eunice Liu

dogapult:

the pact has been made.

dogapult:

the pact has been made.

(via twerkinghitler)

gelatins:

kids born in 2000 never have to worry about forgetting how old they are

(via twerkinghitler)

i think my dads post for my birthday will still be my favorite one of the evening though

image

(Source: itsbetterthananal, via twerkinghitler)

nonomella:

I made this powerpoint for this week’s lesson - Regional/Iconic American Foods. I went back through and replaced all the text with my student’s reactions.

(via twerkinghitler)

(Source: imgfave, via twerkinghitler)

(Source: tkr, via twerkinghitler)

levanna:

plushestrumpest:

30secondstocalifornia:

wingscanspeak:

zorobro:

wingscannotspeak:

peetasboxers:

kissyourneck-slitmythroat:

I showed this post to my boyfriend and he tried to take his shirt off like a girl and 

uh

yeah

Out of the 82k notes my post got this is by far the best comment holy shit thank u for being u

So i tried it both ways and uh

i mean how do you do the first one without pulling out all your hair?

this made me laugh really hard….

and it made me realize that girls and boys pull their shirt off differently. /amazed

but seriously I think girls just do the cross arm thing because of HAIR like demonstrated 

So one year, one URL change, and a hair cut later, I decide to try again… FOR SCIENCE! 

Its not science unless you write it down so 

First method:

image
Well done, i guess…

Second:

image
I fucked up

Girls… how?

I DON’T UNDERSTAND HOW WE CAN HAVE SUCH DIFFERENT WAYS OF TAKING OFF SHIRTS AND SO MUCH DIFFICULTY DOING IT THE OTHER WAY

Science

(Source: princessveroni, via twerkinghitler)

bouncethatafro:

THIS PERSON IS SO UNDERCOOKED WE CAN INVITE THEM OVER FOR DINNER AGAIN

bouncethatafro:

THIS PERSON IS SO UNDERCOOKED WE CAN INVITE THEM OVER FOR DINNER AGAIN

(Source: iguanamouth, via twerkinghitler)

donnysoldier:

andangelstofly:

oomshi:

(x)

But the titanic sank?

donnysoldier:

andangelstofly:

oomshi:

(x)

But the titanic sank?

image

(via twerkinghitler)

becomming:

xlizardx:

Apparently this is "The clearest photo of Mercury ever taken."

why isnt everyone getting so excited about this, it is literally another planet look at how beautiful it is stop what your doing and look at how alien like this planet is what is living there oh my god mercury

becomming:

xlizardx:

Apparently this is "The clearest photo of Mercury ever taken."

why isnt everyone getting so excited about this, it is literally another planet look at how beautiful it is stop what your doing and look at how alien like this planet is what is living there oh my god mercury

(via ricekrispy)

"

If you took a group of babies and said to their parents, “Today I’m going to teach them to walk,” their parents would think you were a crazy person and take their children away. If you took a group of toddlers and said to their parents, “Today I’m going to teach them to use the potty,” their parents would think you were a crazy person and take their children away. But if you take a group of 9 year olds and say to their parents, “Today I’m going to teach them fractions,” they think that’s normal.

No.

Children learn different skills at different times because they’re individuals and they’re interested in different things. If they’re keen on baking or making change or working in the wood shop or something like that they may be ready to learn about fractions otherwise they’re learning about it in abstraction. It’s not going to stick. It’s going to jiggle right out of their heads. They’re going to retain it for the test, regurgitate it, and forget it. That’s if they’re lucky.

If they’re unlucky they’re going to do some of these things: struggle with it terribly, turn something they didn’t know about into something they hate, do poorly on the test, feel bad about their inability to do the work, meet with the disappointment of their parents and teacher, get laughed at by their peers or siblings, and develop a full-on mistrust of their own capacities, a desire to run away from challenges, a hardened heart, and the desire to explore, learn, and investigate will be deviated into the desire to just get a good grade and be done.

You don’t want this. Wait. Wait until the child has a legitimate reason to learn a thing. It will stick. The learning will come along faster and it won’t foster in the child the desire to appear to know what he doesn’t know just to escape the horror of not learning it when everyone else did.

"

The Libertarian Homeschooler (via libertydidact)

(via sheilajakeandsophie)

(via discolor3d)